The Algerian Tragedy  

ALGERIA: THE REALITIES, by Germaine Tillion. Alfred A. Knopf, New York. 1958. Germaine Tillion’s Algeria is a beautifully written, but seriously flawed, book. The author, an ethnologist and a leading French authority on the sociology of Algeria, has put together …



Lonely Outsiders  

WHITE MAN, LISTEN!, by Richard Wright No one knows better than Richard Wright that the white man has not listened for a century, has neither plans nor intention to start listening now and probably couldn’t listen if he wanted to. …



Middle East in Conflict  

This collection of essays and studies on the Middle East was brought together by its editor with a novel purpose in mind. The people of this area of the world are struggling to adjust to new conditions; their loyalties conflict …



The Court and Civil Liberty  

The June decisions of the Supreme Court were major decisions; this is so even if those to whom the decisions applied directly, or who had initiated the actions that led through the federal courts, have already left the scene. The …



Africa Finds its Voice  

No sooner had the upheavals in Asia that followed upon the Second World War begun to subside a little than new and still more elemental social forces made themselves felt in the world. Africa, oldest of the continents in terms …



British Labor Views the Future  

A strange silence fell over the British Labor Party immediately after its electoral defeat. Even the flurry of mutual recrimination within the party leadership hardly lasted more than a few days. The annual party conference held in October of last …



Socratic Elunchus  

CHARLES A. BEARD: AN APPRAISAL, edited by Howard K. Beale. University of Kentucky Press, 312 pages. $4.50. Charles A. Beard once summarized for a friend the “laws of history”: First, whom the gods would destroy they first make mad. Second, …



British Labor in Retrospect  

“Some, indeed, said things were worse; that the morals of the people declined from this very time; that the people, hardened by the danger they had been in, like seamen after a storm is over, were more wicked and more …