Spain, the U.S., and Latin America

Spain, the U.S., and Latin America

Since taking office last December, Spain’s new Socialist government has accorded foreign policy a central role. This signifies quite a turnabout. For, ever since the beginning of this century—excepting the Civil War of the 1930s—Spain has been rather a passive witness than a participant on the interna- tional scene. The disrepute of the Franco dictator- ship consigned the country to still greater, enforced international isolation, which was partly alleviated in the ’50s, when it submitted to a client-state relationship with the United States. More recently, in the years of post-Franco democratization, 1976– 82, an overwhelming preoccupation with the new parliamentary structure and domestic problems— together with the fact that for the last two of those years an increasingly indecisive center-right government held office—resulted in further neglect of most foreign-policy issues.

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