From a Labor Journal

From a Labor Journal

With the depression that followed World War I, Detroit became a beehive of radical activity. Splits occurred in the Socialist party, with some of the members flocking into the Communist party and others forming new groups, like the Proletarian University or the Marxian Club. Also making themselves heard in those days were the Socialist Labor party, the Industrial Workers of the World, the Anarchists, and free-lance radicals too individualistic to fit into any group. Some groups conducted forums of their own, like the Proletarian University, which was formed by Al Renner, John Keracher, and Dennis Batt. The Proletarian University also sponsored classes and published a magazine, copies of which can still be found in the University of Michigan Labor Archives. The Proletarian University developed factions and splits, and eventually Batt, Renner, and Keracher formed the Proletarian party. And now I want to say something about a gentle anarchist woman to whom I owe a lasting debt of gratitude. Miss Haug was a retired schoolteacher; I met her for the first time when she delivered a lecture on geology to a socialist audience.

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Lima