A Bohemia For Our Time

A Bohemia For Our Time

ATTORNEY GENERAL A. Mitchell Palmer had barely begun his roundup of foreign born radicals when alumni of the Greenwich Village “Little Renaissance” of the 1910s began to write the movement’s epitaph. Waldo Frank’s Our America (1919) set the tone for much of what was to come. The great achievement of Greenwich Village was its fusion of political and cultural radicalism—epitomized by the work of the brilliant critic Randolph Bourne, whose early death from influenza in December 1918 marked the end of a moment of extraordinary promise. “With him gone,” Frank lamented, “the political and artistic columns of advance—Life and the Machine are again severed.” Artistic modernists and leftist revolution- aries went their separate ways. “The men who listen to [Alfred] Stieglitz have not yet. . . joined him in their mind with the example of Bill Haywood. And the readers of socialistic pamphlets have not heard of ‘291.”‘

...

Lima