What Next for Arms Control?  

The Intermediate Range Nuclear Forces(INF) agreement will be ratified by the Senate this spring, setting new precedents for arms control agreements: (1) actual reductions in the number of nuclear warheads held by the superpowers; (2)asymmetrical reductions of weapons; (3) intrusive …



Arms Control: Reality and Mirage  

As we move toward the 1986 elections, the prospect of a U.S.-Soviet arms control agreement has become simultaneously more visible and more of a mirage. The sense of progress has been heightened by a rapid exchange of letters and public …



Star Wars: A Dangerous Chimera  

The Strategic Defense Initiative or “Star Wars” is dominating the national security debate. Star Wars is seen by some as “the most radical change in strategic policy since World War II” (Business Week, June 20, 1983), combining radically new technologies …



Why There is No Arms Control  

In 1972, the United States and the Soviet Union implemented agreements limiting antiballistic missile defense and intercontinental ballistic missiles. That year, the U.S. had roughly 5,700 strategic nuclear warheads, 1,054 ICBMs, 656 SLCMs, and 463 strategic bombers. The Soviet Union had …