The Inimitable GBS  

The most famous European writer of the first half of the twentieth century was not Proust, Kafka, Joyce, Mann, Yeats, Pound, Eliot, Rilke, Lawrence, Brecht, Gide, or Pasternak. In fact, if one could somehow quantify literary celebrity, I suspect these …



A Participatory Economy  

LOOKING FORWARD: PARTICIPATORY ECONOMICS FOR THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY, by Michael Albert and Robin Hahnel South End Press, 1991. 153 pp., $10.00. THE POLITICAL ECONOMY OF PARTICIPATORY ECONOMICS, by Michael Albert and Robin Hahnel Princeton University Press, 1991. 132 pp., $12.95. …



No Word For Utopia?  

Securus iudicat orbis terrarum, says a maxim of Roman law; which means, loosely translated: the New York Times, the New York Review of Books and the Times Literary Supplement can’t all be wrong. Isaiah Berlin is a certified sage, an …



Defenders of Marxism  

Anyone who thinks that the collapse of the Soviet and East European regimes discredited Marxism and socialism is-to put it charitably-having an off day. As Alasdair MacIntyre, no sympathizer, once observed: “The barbarous despotism of the collective Tsardom which reigns …



The Modern Mind  

There seems to be a connection, historical and perhaps even logical, between metaphysics and morality; that is, between views about the nature of being or knowledge and views about justice and the good. A vague sense (which is surely all …



Socialists & Catholics  

John Cort has taken on a vexed and interesting topic: the politics of Christianity. As intellectual history, Christian Socialism deserves a straight A-even if, as political advocacy, it’s less easy to grade. Cort has subtitled his book “An Informal History,” …