A Talk with Owen Bieber of the Law  

In mid-July, on a hot Detroit afternoon, I came to Solidarity House—the national headquarters of the United Automobile Workers Union—to have a talk with Owen Bieber, the union’s new president. The result follows below. In a 1961 filni illustrating how …



A Talk with Owen Bieber of the UAW  

In mid-July, on a hot Detroit afternoon, I came to Solidarity House—the national headquarters of the United Automobile Workers Union—to have a talk with Owen Bieber, the union’s new president. The result follows below. In a 1961 film illustrating how …



Unions & Radicals: Uneasy Relations  

David Brody is a bright young scholar who has made a serious effort to bring a new perspective to the study of American trade unions. His views are contained in this group of essays, which might more appropriately have been …



Communists’ Role in the Unions  

Labor and Communism: The Conflict That Shaped American Unions, by Bert Cochran. Princeton: Princeton University Press. 394 pp. Cloth, $25.00; paper, $6.95. As a participant and survivor of the labor and radical struggles of the 1930s and 1940s, Bert Cochran …



Blacks & Unions  

BLACK DETROIT AND THE RISE OF THE UAW, by August Meier and Elliott Rudwick. New York: Oxford University Press. 289 pp. $15.00. This book has many virtues. It is a well-documented, well-written and lively study of one of the crucial …



New Trends in the Unions  

The emergence of two distinct and conflicting tendencies within the trade unions—roughly, a Republican and a Democratic wing—has become more visible in 1973, although signs of this could already be seen during the 1972 presidential campaign. Dramatic evidence of this …



Black City, Black Unions?  

Detroit in the 1970s is startlingly different from the factory complex associated with the auto industry, the UAW, and Walter Reuther. Auto workers no longer rush to and from huge industrial plants on the east and west sides. Now the …



The Split Deepens In the Trade Unions  

Schisms within the trade unions reflect the fragmentation of American politics. Sooner or later policy differences, personal ambitions, and personality antagonisms were bound to set George Meany and Walter Reuther on a collision course. Working within the framework of an …