The Last Page

The Last Page

If this were a nineteenth-century book and not a modern magazine, the last few entries of a lengthy, cluttered index might appear right here, listing every conceivable and inconceivable topic along with the appropriate page number. We see very few indexes like that anymore. Books published by commercial publishers today tend to have no index at all, and the books that are published by university presses contain miserable shrunken indexes of a mere seven or eight or perhaps fifteen pages, but not more, which, from a nineteenth-century point of view, is brevity itself. (In modem academic tomes, it is the bibliography that runs on forever—not the index.) And yet, from time to time the old nineteenth-century inspiration does seize a modern publisher, and you turn to the back of a fresh new book, and the double columns of little print deploy across an astounding number of pages, and you discover

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Wurgraft | University of California Press Lima