Richard Rothstein Responds

Richard Rothstein Responds

Neither H. Brand nor Joanne Barkan finds much to dispute in my analysis of the forces that drive immigration, the impossibility of fully consistent positions in response to calls for its restriction, or the desirability of progressive social policies to ameliorate immigrants’ conditions and blunt the reaction of domestic workers with whom they compete.

Rather, Brand’s and Barkan’s complaint is not with my analysis but with my sentimentality—I “sound too little concerned with . . .what it’s like to be inside” the immigrant experience (Barkan) and, although I “briefly note immigrants” low wages,” I am “not otherwise concerned with their working conditions,” and, reading my article “one doesn’t get a sense of the gravity of the problem” (Brand).

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