Poland: Intellectuals vs. The Party [A Report on the Kolakowski Case]

Poland: Intellectuals vs. The Party [A Report on the Kolakowski Case]

Students and faculty at the University of Warsaw can roughly be divided into two groups: one group of orthodox Marxists, which consists of about 5-10 per cent of the University population—and the majority group of liberal Marxists which can be subdivided into one very active group and another that is passive and seems to be indifferent to politics.

This last sub-group lives in constant terror of the Ministry of the Interior. These intellectuals have a most negative view of Communism in its present form and find it abominable; but they are convinced that none of them can do anything to change it. They know that any attempt to change things leads to trouble with the Party, and especially with Moczar, the Minister of the Interior. An intellectual suspected by Moczar is denied foreign travel, and his very livelihood is at stake. They all hate Moczar; but they want to keep their jobs, and they like to go occasionally abroad. So they remain silent, live in constant fear and insecurity, and suffer.

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Wurgraft | University of California Press Lima