Let’s Talk Sense About Oswald

Let’s Talk Sense About Oswald

Three years after President Kennedy’s assassination, we still don’t know much more than on the day after it. Nor are we ever likely to know more. The Warren Commission and its critics have not produced conclusive evidence of either Oswald’s guilt or his innocence. And unless new evidence comes to light, there is no point in setting up a new commission: the witnesses whose memories have been proved inaccurate are not going to change their testimony; members of any new commission are not likely to disagree with the first one on fundamentals; even if a second investigation could be conducted more leisurely and more carefully, even if it were to follow the hundreds of minor tracks which some have suggested it should explore, it would hardly arrive at more solid and substantial conclusions. Critics of the Warren Report would still shout “whitewash,” though their criticism will still have to be based on the Commission’s 26 volumes.

For we must give this much credit to the Warren Report: though in places it may read like an indictment of Oswald, it has provided much evidence that runs counter to its main contentions. With a single exception— the discovery of two witnesses who reported the Tippit murder to the police, and these had not actually seen the shooting—the case for Oswald has been built exclusively on material contained in the Warren Report.

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