Fruits of Glasnost

Fruits of Glasnost

For the past two years Soviet newspapers and magazines have used the unexpected freedom made available by glasnost. Once, editors had to clear all questionable material with the censors; now, if they ask, they are told to decide for themselves. The censor who regularly used to sit in on editorial meetings is not to be seen; the “index” of taboo subjects has shrunk drastically. Even old time-servers like Aleksandr Chakovsky, member of the party’s Central Committee and the Writers’ Union board and until recently editor of Literaturnaya gazeta, take advantage of expanded opportunities to print articles both startling and fascinating, while editors appointed by Gorbachev, like Vitaly Korotich (Ogonek) and Yegor Yakovlev (Moscow News), are often ahead of him in what they perceive the press can and should do.

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